Cote d'Ivoire

Economics, Political, and Trade Overview

Source: Feb 10, 2022 Economist Intelligence Unit

Cote d'Ivoire - In Short.

Overview of Cote d'Ivoire

Various small kingdoms ruled the area of Cote d’Ivoire between the 15th and 19th centuries, when European explorers arrived and then began to expand their presence. In 1844, France established a protectorate. During this period, many of these kingdoms and tribes fought to maintain their cultural identities – some well into the 20th century. For example, the Sanwi kingdom – originally founded in the 17th century – tried to break away from Cote d’Ivoire and establish an independent state in 1969.  After becoming independent in 1960, Cote d’Ivoire took advantage of close ties with France, cocoa production and export, and foreign investment to become one of the most prosperous states in West Africa. In December 1999, however, a military coup overthrew the government. In late 2000, junta leader Robert GUEI held rigged elections and declared himself the winner. Popular protests forced him to step aside and Laurent GBAGBO was elected. In September 2002, Ivoirian dissidents and members of the military launched a failed coup that developed into a civil war. In 2003, a cease-fire resulted in rebels holding the north, the government holding the south, and peacekeeping forces occupying a buffer zone in the middle. In March 2007, President GBAGBO and former rebel leader Guillaume SORO signed an agreement in which SORO joined GBAGBO’s government as prime minister. The two agreed to reunite the country by dismantling the buffer zone, integrating rebel forces into the national armed forces, and holding elections. In November 2010, Alassane Dramane OUATTARA won the presidential election, but GBAGBO refused to hand over power, resulting in five months of violent conflict. In April 2011, after widespread fighting, GBAGBO was formally forced from office by armed OUATTARA supporters and UN and French forces. In 2015, OUATTARA won a second term. In October 2020, OUATTARA won a controversial third presidential term, despite a two-term limit in the Ivoirian constitution. In March 2021, the International Criminal Court in The Hague ruled on a final acquittal for GBAGBO, who was on trial for crimes against humanity.    
Value
Country Full Name
Cote d’Ivoire
Country Code
CIV
Region
Sub-Saharan Africa
Income Group
Lower middle income
Currency Unit
GDP
61348579465
Population
26378275
Land Area
318000
Net National Income Per Capita
2140.694968
GDP per Capita (PPP)
5465.514544

2020 GDP Growth Rate (Current USD)

2020 GDP Per Capita (Current USD)

2020 Urbanization Rate (%)

2020 Total Fertility Rate (Birth Per Woman)

Doing Business Score (100= Most Friendly)

Cote d'Ivoire - Economic

Economy of Cote d'Ivoire

For the last 5 years Cote d’Ivoire’s growth rate has been among the highest in the world. Cote d’Ivoire is heavily dependent on agriculture and related activities, which engage roughly two-thirds of the population. Cote d’Ivoire is the world’s largest producer and exporter of cocoa beans and a significant producer and exporter of coffee and palm oil. Consequently, the economy is highly sensitive to fluctuations in international prices for these products and to climatic conditions. Cocoa, oil, and coffee are the country’s top export revenue earners, but the country has targeted agricultural processing of cocoa, cashews, mangoes, and other commodities as a high priority. Mining gold and exporting electricity are growing industries outside agriculture.Following the end of more than a decade of civil conflict in 2011, Cote d’Ivoire has experienced a boom in foreign investment and economic growth. In June 2012, the IMF and the World Bank announced $4.4 billion in debt relief for Cote d’Ivoire under the Highly Indebted Poor Countries Initiative.

Unemployment Rate

Inflation Rate

Cote d'Ivoire - GDP Composition

GDP Composiiton & Value Added of Cote d'Ivoire

Last Updated: Jan, 2021, Updated For 2020.

Cote d'Ivoire - GDP, Value Added

Demographics of Cote d'Ivoire

the population is primarily located in the forested south, with the highest concentration of people residing in and around the cities on the Atlantic coast; most of the northern savanna remains sparsely populated with higher concentrations located along transportation corridors as shown in this population distribution map
Geographic Location

Western Africa, bordering the North Atlantic Ocean, between Ghana and Liberia

Races

Akan 28.9%, Voltaique or Gur 16.1%, Northern Mande 14.5%, Kru 8.5%, Southern Mande 6.9%, unspecified 0.9%, non-Ivoirian 24.2% (2014 est.)

Languages

French (official), 60 native dialects of which Dioula is the most widely spokenmajor-language

Religion

Muslim 42.9%, Catholic 17.2%, Evangelical 11.8%, Methodist 1.7%, other Christian 3.2%, animist 3.6%, other religion 0.5%, none 19.1% (2014 est.)note: the majority of foreign migrant workers are Muslim (72.7%) and Christian (17.7%)

Dependency & Expectancy of Cote d'Ivoire

Last Updated: Jan, 2021

Dependency Ratio

Expectancy

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Cote d'Ivoire - Social Media Briefing

Cote d'Ivoire - Social Media & Social Commerce

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Politics & Policies of Cote d'Ivoire

2021 Policies Overview

Updated Coming in March 2021 after our team finish summarizing countries policy.

International Organizations

ACP, AfDB, AU, ECOWAS, EITI (compliant country), Entente, FAO, FZ, G-24, G-77, IAEA, IBRD, ICAO, ICC, ICCt, ICRM, IDA, IDB, IFAD, IFC, IFRCS, ILO, IMF, IMO, Interpol, IOC, IOM, IPU, ISO, ITSO, ITU, ITUC (NGOs), MIGA, MINUSMA, MONUSCO, NAM, OIC, OIF, OPCW, UN, UNCTAD, UNESCO, UNHCR, UNIDO, Union Latina, UN Security Council (temporary), UNWTO, UPU, WADB (regional), WAEMU, WCO, WFTU (NGOs), WHO, WIPO, WMO, WTO

Import of Cote d'Ivoire

Export of Cote d'Ivoire

Import Destination

Export Destination